Foundation for Louisiana hires Ameca Reali as New Orleans Program Officer

Lousiana’s

Among Reali’s work will include the management of the Foundation’s TOGETHER Initiative, which works with partners to empower residents to rebuild and strengthen disenfranchised communities by promoting leadership, policy-making and grant-funding opportunities.

New Orleans, LA — Foundation for Louisiana (FFL) announced that Ameca Reali has joined the organization as the New Orleans Program Officer and will manage a range of foundation initiatives specifically related to the greater New Orleans area.

“Foundation for Louisiana is excited to have a leader of Ameca’s caliber join our team,” President and CEO Flozell Daniels, Jr. said. “She is a nationally recognized social entrepreneur with a proven record of achievement in advancing inclusive and equitable outcomes with New Orleans community members.”

Among Reali’s work will include the management of the Foundation’s TOGETHER Initiative, which works with partners to empower residents to rebuild and strengthen disenfranchised communities by promoting leadership, policy-making and grant-funding opportunities.

“The Foundation for Louisiana has assembled an incredibly talented team of people who are all dedicated to building stronger more sustainable communities for the people of Louisiana and I am grateful to be able to join them,” Reali said. “I am excited to bring my passion for social justice to the Foundation’s work of uplifting the voices of those most deeply rooted in the social and environmental culture of the state.”

A native of New York, Reali graduated cum laude from the State University of New York at Buffalo with a degree in Communication and moved to New Orleans to attend Loyola University School of Law. In 2011 Reali was awarded an Echoing Green Fellowship and co-founded the Justice and Accountability Center of Louisiana and served as the Executive Director for five years. Since 2008 she has worked on a range of legal issues affecting marginalized communities such as capital appeals, access to courts, housing discrimination and education reform in Post Katrina New Orleans.