Grants support Baton Rouge groups’ responses to Alton Sterling shooting

Lousiana’s

Over the past two months, staffers from the New Orleans Video Access Center has been collaborating with filmmakers in the capital city to tell the stories of neighborhood groups, faith leaders, organizers and other citizens who are making their mark in the community.

FFL’s Rapid Response Fund continues to provide support where it’s needed in Baton Rouge — through a diverse range of local efforts. Over the past two months, staffers from the New Orleans Video Access Center have been collaborating with filmmakers in the capital city to tell the stories of neighborhood groups, faith leaders, organizers and other citizens who are making their mark in the community.

FFL has gotten behind this work by providing a $4,500 grant to help expand this documentary series.

For example, check out the second episode in the series: “I Just Draw Pictures” tells the story of Jo Hines, a local artist who painted a mural of Alton Sterling at the Triple S Food Store where he was shot and killed by police offers. Hines hopes that, through his art, he can find healing for himself and the viewer while delivery a positive message to communities in crisis.

Watch here.

Elsewhere, FFL awarded Kids Rethink New Orleans Schools (or Rethink) a $5,000 grant for training youth organizers and Baton Rouge Youth Coalition adult staff on the principles of organizing, so that they may be more strategically positioned to respond to the shooting of Alton Sterling.

You can support our Rapid Response Fund’s efforts by contributing here.

Read more about our Rapid Response Fund here.